Temporary Artistic Uses of Public Space: Two Less Famous Squares in Cairo (Part 2)

This contribution has been written by Astrid Thews. She has been living in Cairo, Egypt, for several years now. Together with Mayada Said and three other women, she co-founded Mahatat for contemporary art at the beginning of 2011. Mahatat for contemporary art is an initiative for art in public space and community art projects. Mayada Said and Astrid Thews have been contributing to aminachaudri.ch since January 2013. In their texts, they describe events and portray people they have encountered through their work in Egypt. They make no claim to present a complete and representative description in their writing; on the contrary, they aim to contribute to a more differentiated picture of the country. The current situation in Egypt generates intense media interest. However, in the present contribution published in two parts, the authors tell of the temporary transformations of two squares in Cairo – transformations which are achieved through very different artistic interventions.

As a preliminary remark, Thews would like to say that Mahatat is continuing to realise art projects throughout this year and is planning further projects for next year. Sudden changes of plan are, of course, always possible, as are short-term changes of dates and project venues due to current events. Everyday life, though it may have changed, continues.

Review of part 1: Video art at Lazoughli Square

In the first part of this report, we described our project at Lazoughli Square, close to Egypt’s Ministry of Interior. On a small screen, we showed video art chosen by our curator Yara Mekawei. We recounted how we inadvertently created an intimate space for two hours, into which few passersby dared to intrude.

Nature in the city

Three months later we wanted to transform Soliman Gohar Square, on the other side of the Nile. We wanted to do this together with the neighbourhood, and we wanted to avoid creating another bubble. Soliman Gohar Square is situated west of the Nile on a street of the same name. The street is known throughout Cairo for its affordable and lively fruit and vegetable market. It is also notorious for the rubbish heaps deposited there by residents until they are picked up by garbage carts. There are, of course, countless other such squares in Cairo and Giza – why did we choose this one? First, it is close to our Mahatat office. It seemed fitting to realise our first neighbourhood project in our own neighbourhood. Second, despite having only one driving lane, the small square is much frequented. The whole neighbourhood is very lively and full of shopping pedestrians, and the square, with its family atmosphere, features a circular patch of green in its middle. Around the square and in the neighbourhood as a whole, a large number of trees are growing. Life, liveliness and nature come together in this square in the middle of the city – which is why we chose this location: our project, after all, was about trees.

Soliman Gohar Square

Soliman Gohar Square

The residents, their children and their trees

Amr Abd Elaziz, our curator for the exhibition in the square, did a little field research and interviewed people from the neighbourhood on the topic of trees. He found that people showed considerable interest in trees. So the Danish video artist Nanna Guldhammer, who offered a children’s workshop for the project, began spending time in and around Soliman Gohar Square. For a couple of weeks, Nanna drank tea with countless people and listened to their stories. During those weeks, she met the man who had planted most of the trees in the neighbourhood. He proudly led Nanna to different trees and told her which he had planted when.

Together with a few children from the neighbourhood, Nanna, Noha Hesham, Eslam Hamed, Dina Fahmy and Mustafa Nagah created papier-mâché objects and textiles with potato prints. These were to be displayed around the square on the day of the festival we wanted to organise.

June 8, 2012

A few months before, we had decided on this date, a Friday, for our festival. By the end of May, however, demonstrations were being planned for that day, because people were intently awaiting the results of the presidential election. We consulted our partners and the artists and decided to postpone the festival. We didn’t really know until when – after all, who can say what will happen? We waited until the evening. As there was no big news of shocking events, we called the participants again. Jointly, we decided to meet at Soliman Gohar Square the next day.

June 9, 2012, Soliman Gohar Square

A few days before the event, the graffiti and mural artist Mohamed Khaled and his team had painted on the wall of a house. The owner of the house had agreed to have his property decorated with a colourful illustration for one of the stories to be told. Thus the stage was set for the evening: the storytellers would be able to share their stories with the residents in front of the painted wall.

10:30

Soliman Gohar Square

Soliman Gohar Square

Nanna identified the trees’ species ahead of time. She then asked a calligrapher to write the names of the trees on pieces of fabric. Now, on the day of the festival, she is tying them to the corresponding trees. Weiterlesen…

Temporary Artistic Uses of Public Space: Two Less Famous Squares in Cairo (Part 1)

This contribution has been written by Astrid Thews and Mayada Said. Having lived in Cairo, Egypt, for several years, they co-founded Mahatat for contemporary art at the beginning of 2011. Mahatat for contemporary art is an initiative for art in public space and community art projects. Here on aminachaudri.ch Thews and Said describe events and portray people they have encountered through their work in Egypt. They make no claim to present a complete and representative description in their writing; on the contrary, they aim to contribute to a more differentiated picture of the country. In the present contribution, published in two parts, they tell of the temporary transformations of two squares in Cairo – transformations achieved through very different artistic interventions.

From Tahrir Square…

Tahrir Square is probably the best-known square in Egypt: most people in Europe have heard of it through the media in the context of the revolution that began on January 25, 2011. Tahrir Square is at a central location (as far as this can be said in a megacity with an estimated 25 million inhabitants) and carries much symbolic meaning. It has become a symbol of resistance and the site of sometimes bloody clashes between protesters and security forces. It has been described often, and it still appears in pictures and videos broadcast by international media. Days and weeks during which protesters assemble here and fight for their rights are followed by days and weeks during which the square is open to traffic, and people, for the most part, go about their everyday business and simply pass through on their way – until it is claimed again by protesters and tents.

… to Lazoughli and Soliman Gohar Square

Of course there are many more public squares in Cairo, small as well as big ones, even if they are not under the spotlight of the media and are of less significance in terms of national security and interest. For the residents living around these squares, however, they play an important role in everyday life. This report is about two such squares: the so-called Lazoughli Square and Soliman Gohar Square.

Lazoughli Square is located east of the Nile, close to the Ministry of Interior in the Mounira neighbourhood. It used to be very busy, and it has several traffic lanes and an anonymous feel. It is quieter today, for the obvious reason that the military or Ministry of Interior repeatedly put up barriers in downtown Cairo and Mounira in order to protect the ministry and other public buildings from protesters, to split up broad avenues and interrupt or stop demonstrations.

Soliman Gohar Square is located west of the Nile on a street of the same name, a street known all over Cairo for its cheap and lively fruit and vegetable market. This market, however, is also notorious for piles of rubbish deposited by the residents for garbage carts to pick up.

Lazoughli Square

Lazoughli Square

Soliman Gohar Square

Soliman Gohar Square

There is a lot of traffic through this little square, which only has one traffic lane, and the entire neighbourhood is very lively and crowded with shopping pedestrians. There is a rather familial atmosphere to it. In the middle of the square there is a circular patch of vegetation, and around the square – as well as in the whole neighbourhood – there are plenty of trees.

Superficially, these two squares do not seem to have much in common. What connects them for Mahatat for contemporary art, however, is that we chose both as temporary sites for our first large-scale project, Shaware3na (which translates as “our streets”). Mahatat means “stations” or “stops”: we see ourselves as a mobile initiative for art in public space and community art projects. Weiterlesen…

Künstlerische Zwischennutzung: Von zwei weniger medienpräsenten Plätzen in Kairo – Teil 1

Dieser Beitrag wurde von Astrid Thews und Mayada Said verfasst. Die beiden Frauen leben seit mehreren Jahren in Kairo, Ägypten, und haben Anfang 2011 „Mahatat for contemporary art“ mitbegründet – eine Initiative für Kunst im öffentlichen Raum und partizipative Kunstprojekte. Hier auf www.aminachaudri.ch schildern Astrid Thews und Mayada Said Begebenheiten und porträtieren Personen, denen sie in Ägypten durch ihre Arbeit begegnet sind. Die Verfasserinnen erheben dabei keinen Anspruch auf Generalisierung, möchten sie doch vielmehr zu einem differenzierteren Bild über Ägypten beitragen. Im vorliegenden Beitrag in zwei Teilen geht es um die temporäre Verwandlung zweier Plätze in Kairo durch sehr unterschiedliche künstlerische Interventionen.

Vom Tahrir-Platz…

Der wohl bekannteste Platz Ägyptens ist der Tahrir-Platz, von dem in Europa die meisten im Zuge der Revolution des 25. Januars 2011 in den Medien gehört haben. Der Tahrir-Platz ist zentral gelegen (soweit sich das im Falle einer Megastadt mit geschätzten 25 Millionen Einwohnern sagen lässt) und ein Ort voller Symbolik. Er ist zum Schauplatz des Widerstands und Sinnbild teils blutiger Auseinandersetzungen zwischen Demonstranten und Sicherheitskräften geworden. Oft wurde er beschrieben und noch immer taucht er in stillen und bewegten Bildern internationaler Medien auf. Auf Tage und Wochen, an denen sich hier Demonstranten versammeln und für ihre Rechte eintreten, folgen Tage und Wochen, an denen der Platz für den Autoverkehr wieder geöffnet wird und die Menschen hier grösstenteils ihren Alltagsgeschäften nachgehen oder ihn schlichtweg passieren, bis Demonstranten den Ort wieder zurückerobern und ihre Zelte aufschlagen.

… zum Lazoughli-Platz und zum Soliman-Gohar-Platz

Natürlich gibt es in Kairo unzählige weitere grosse und kleine Plätze – wenn auch von erheblich weniger grossem Medieninteresse und geringerer staatspolitischer Bedeutung. Für ihre Anwohner spielen diese Plätze im Alltag jedoch eine grosse Rolle. Um zwei solche kleinere Plätze geht es in diesem Beitrag: um den sogenannten Lazoughli-Platz und um den Soliman-Gohar-Platz.

Der Lazoughli-Platz liegt auf der östlichen Nilseite in der Nähe des Innenministeriums im Stadtteil Mounira. Einst war er vielbefahren, mehrspurig und hatte eine anonyme Ausstrahlung. Ist er heute weniger befahren, so liegt dies offenkundig an den Mauern, die immer wieder in Downtown und Mounira vom Militär oder dem Innenministerium aufgezogen werden, um selbiges oder andere öffentliche Gebäude vor Demonstranten zu schützen oder breite Strassen zu trennen, um Demonstrationen abzubrechen oder zu unterbinden.

Der Soliman-Gohar-Platz befindet sich auf der westlichen Nilseite an der gleichnamigen Strasse, die für ihren günstigen und belebten Gemüse- und Obstmarkt in ganz Kairo bekannt ist. Berüchtigt ist letzterer allerdings auch für Abfallberge, die Anwohner hier lagern, bis sie von Müllkarren abgeholt werden.

Lazoughli-Platz

Lazoughli-Platz

Soliman-Gohar-Platz

Soliman-Gohar-Platz

Der kleine Platz ist vielbefahren, einspurig jedoch, und das gesamte Viertel ist belebt und voller einkaufender Fussgänger. Es herrscht eine eher familiäre Atmosphäre. In der Mitte des Platzes ist eine kreisrunde Grünfläche und um den Platz herum sowie im gesamten Viertel gibt es viele Bäume. Oberflächlich scheinen diese beiden Plätze also nicht viel gemein zu haben. Was die beiden Orte für uns von Mahatat for contemporary art jedoch verbindet, ist, dass wir sie 2012 beide temporär zu Schauplätzen unseres ersten grossen Projektes „Shaware3na“ (zu Deutsch „unsere Strassen“) verwandelten.

Weiterlesen…

Courage for Art: Women Story-Tellers Turn Cairo’s Metro into a Stage

This contribution has been written by Astrid Thews and Mayada Said. The two women have been living in Cairo, Egypt for several years now and have co-founded the organization “Mahatat for contemporary art” at the beginning of 2011. “Mahatat for contemporary art” is an initiative for art in public space and community art projects. Here on aminachaudri.ch, the women describe events and portray people they have encountered through their work in Egypt. They make no claim to generalisation in their writing; on the contrary, the authors aim to contribute to a more differentiated picture of the country. The present contribution is the second article they publish on aminachaudri.ch. It tells of young Egyptian women who, within the framework of a Mahatat project, went into Cairo’s metro to tell their and other women’s stories.

February 17, 2012. Cairo. It is afternoon: two young women approach the metro station “Opera”. To their right rises the imposing white building of the opera, built in the 1980s with funds from the Japanese development cooperation. Operas and concerts are staged here regularly – for those who can afford it. Behind the two women, the Qasr al-Nil Bridge leads to the Tahrir Square. On a normal day, the bridge is a place where young couples meet, stand hand in hand at the railing, or sit on the brightly coloured plastic chairs of one of the “flying cafés” while sipping drinks sold on the sidewalk either from a little cart or a hawker’s tray. The Qasr al-Nil Bridge gained sad notoriety beyond Egypt’s borders on January 28, 2011, when images of how Mubarak’s police brutally intervened in a demonstration, injuring and killing many people, went around the world.

Art Should Be Accessible to All

Two months after that historic day, the idea for Mahatat was born. To support the emergence of a civil society in Egypt after the revolution, to draw attention to the significance of public space – only recently re-conquered by the citizens – through art and culture, and to make art accessible to all; these are but a few of the reasons behind Mahatat. In January 2012, the first Mahatat project was organized in Cairo. It was called “Shaware3na” – our streets – and started with a series of performances under the title “Art of Transit”. For two months, these performances turned the carriages of the Cairo metro into a stage for different arts.

Stories by and for Women

The two women are Sondos Shabayek and Mona El Shimi. Both are in their twenties and both are story-tellers. They are on their way to the metro to perform in the carriages reserved for women (these metro carriages are meant to protect women from possible harassment by men at certain times of day). In 2005, Mariham Iskander, Naaz khaan and Menan Omar adapted the “Vagina Monologues” of the American author Eve Ensler with a group of students and turned it into play about Egyptian women. They soon realised that the “Vagina Monologues” did not truly reach the Egyptian audience, even as adaptation. The topic, however, appealed to their audience, especially to young women and men: they expressed the wish for stories which would reflect the realities of life faced by women in Egypt. Thus, they came up with the idea to collect real stories. They handed out flyers calling for women to send in their stories. The “BuSSy Monologues” – Explanation here – were born: these are true stories of love, marriage, and family – but also of domestic violence, of the daily harassment of women in the streets, and of rape. Seeing the performance by Sondos and Mona who had joined the group later on in different theatres, we were impressed and invited them to tell these stories as part of the performance series “Art of Transit” in the women’s carriages of the Cairo metro. They agreed. And despite the many difficulties encountered, the performances were to be a success. In an interview about the project, Mona said: “This was the first time I felt that we are telling the stories where they really belong.” 

Women Story-Tellers

Women Story-Tellers

 A Stage on Wheels: The Cairo Metro

We liked the idea of using the metro as a stage. It is a fascinating place where in one short moment, one meets hundreds of people of different age and background– a group of people one would not find assembled in any theatre or gallery. A cross-section of Egyptian society. In a certain way, the metro is already being used as a stage by the many hawkers pushing their way through its often crowded cars, advertising their goods with loud voices and lively gestures. It is not unusual for such goods, from sewing thread to colouring books or plastic wrap, to be presented and explained. Some read aloud from the Quran. The idea to stage art here, on this ‘stage’ in transit, therefore suggested itself. Despite the countless daily interactions taking place in the metro, it remains an anonymous place nevertheless. A means for people to get from A to B. They are in transit, share this special place for one short moment, and yet they all have different destinations.

Weiterlesen…

Gewagte Kunst: Geschichtenerzählerinnen machen die Kairoer Metro zur Bühne

Dieser Beitrag wurde von Astrid Thews und Mayada Said verfasst. Die beiden Frauen leben seit mehreren Jahren in Kairo, Ägypten und haben Anfang 2011 „Mahatat for contemporary art“ mitbegründet – eine Initiative für Kunst im öffentlichen Raum und partizipative Kunstprojekte. Hier auf aminachaudri.ch schildern Astrid Thews und Mayada Said Begebenheiten und porträtieren Personen, denen sie in Ägypten durch ihre Arbeit begegnet sind. Die Verfasserinnen erheben dabei keinen Anspruch auf Generalisierung, möchten sie doch vielmehr zu einem differenzierteren Bild über Ägypten beitragen. Dieser Beitrag ist der zweite Artikel, den die beiden Frauen auf diesem Blog veröffentlichen. Er handelt von jungen Ägypterinnen, die im Rahmen eines Mahatat Projekts ihre Geschichten – sowie die anderer Frauen – in Waggons der Kairoer Metro erzählt haben.

17. Februar 2012. Kairo, Nachmittag: Zwei junge Frauen laufen auf die Metro Haltestelle „Oper“ zu. Rechts von ihnen das grosse weisse Opernhaus, das in den 1980er-Jahren mit Unterstützung der japanischen Entwicklungskooperation erbaut wurde. Regelmässig finden hier Opern und Konzerte statt. Für ein zahlungskräftiges Publikum, versteht sich. Im Rücken der Frauen liegt die Kasr El Nil Brücke, über die man zum Tahrir Platz gelangt. An normalen Tagen treffen sich dort junge Paare, stehen Hand in Hand am Brückengeländer oder sitzen in einem der „fliegenden Cafés“, die bunte Plastikstühle auf dem Bürgersteig aufreihen und aus einem Bauchladen oder einer kleinen rollenden Vitrine Getränke verkaufen. Bekannt wurde die Kasr El Nil Brücke über Ägypten hinaus durch die Bilder des 28. Januars 2011, als Mubaraks Polizei hier brutal gegen Demonstranten vorging und zahlreiche Menschen verletzte und tötete.

Kunst soll für alle Bürger zugänglich sein

Zwei Monate nach jenem wichtigen Tag entstand die Idee zu Mahatat. Um die Bildung einer Zivilgesellschaft in Ägypten nach der Revolution zu unterstützen, um durch Kunst und Kultur auf die Bedeutung des eben von den Bürgern wiedergewonnenen öffentlichen Raumes aufmerksam zu machen, um Kunst für alle zugänglich zu machen – das sind nur einige der Beweggründe. Im Januar 2012 startete dann das erste Mahatat Projekt in Kairo, das sich „Shaware3na“, zu Deutsch „unsere Strassen“ nannte. Den Auftakt machte die Performance-Reihe „Art of Transit“, welche Waggons der Kairoer Metro während zweier Monate in Bühnen für verschiedenste Künste verwandelte.

Geschichten von Frauen für Frauen

Die beiden Frauen heissen Sondos Shabayek und Mona El Shimi, sind Mitte Zwanzig und Geschichtenerzählerinnen. Sie sind auf dem Weg in die Metro, um dort in den Frauenabteilen Waggons, die zu bestimmten Uhrzeiten Frauen vorbehalten sind, um sie vor etwaiger Belästigung durch Männer zu schützen aufzutreten. 2005 adaptierten die Stundentinnen der Amerikanischen Universität in Kairo Mariham Iskander, Naaz khaan und Menan Omar die „Vagina Monologe“ der amerikanischen Autorin Eve Ensler zu einem Stück über Frauen in Ägypten. Bald wurde ihnen aber klar, dass die „Vagina Monologe“ auch in adaptierter Form das ägyptische Publikum nicht ansprachen. Das Thema an sich jedoch gefiel dem Publikum, vor allem jungen Frauen und Männer: sie äusserten den Wunsch nach Geschichten, welche die Lebensrealitäten von Frauen in Ägypten widerspiegeln. So entstand die Idee, reale Geschichten zu sammeln. Mit Flugblättern wurden Frauen dazu aufgefordert, ihre Geschichten einzuschicken. Die „BuSSy Monologe“ – Erläuterung hier – entstanden. Es sind wahre Geschichten über Liebe, Heirat, Familie, aber auch häusliche Gewalt, die tägliche Belästigung von Frauen auf der Strasse und Vergewaltigung. Begeistert von den Auftritten der Frauen, die wir in verschiedenen Theatern gesehen hatten, luden wir Sondos und Mona, die spaeter in das BuSSy Projekt eingestiegen waren, ein, die Geschichten im Rahmen der Reihe „Art of Transit“ in den Frauenabteilen der Metro zu erzählen. Sie stimmten zu, und trotz vieler Schwierigkeiten sollten es gelungene Auftritte werden. In einem Interview zu dem Projekt sagte Mona: „Ich hatte zum ersten Mal das Gefühl, dass wir die Geschichten dort erzählen, wo sie hingehören.“

Women Story-Tellers

Women Story-Tellers

Eine Bühne auf Rädern: Die Kairoer Metro

Uns gefiel die Idee, die Metro als Bühne zu nutzen. Dieser Ort fasziniert uns, denn in einem kurzen Augenblick man trifft hier Hunderte Menschen verschiedenen Alters und verschiedener Herkunft, eine Mischung von Menschen, die man sonst gemeinsam in keinem Theater und keiner Galerie findet. Ein Querschnitt durch die ägyptische Gesellschaft also. Ausserdem wird die Metro bereits gleichsam als Bühne genutzt, und zwar von den zahlreichen Verkäufern, die sich ihren Weg durch oftmals vollgestopfte Waggons bahnen und mit lauter Stimme wild gestikulierend ihre Waren anpreisen. Nicht selten werden diese vorgeführt, ob es sich nun um Nähgarn, Plastikfolie oder Malbücher handelt. Und der ein oder andere liest laut aus dem Koran vor. Für uns lag es deshalb nahe, Kunst auf diese rollende „Bühne“ zu bringen. Trotz der Interaktion, die hier stattfindet, ist die Metro auch ein anonymer Ort, den Menschen nutzen, um von A nach B zu gelangen. Sie befinden sich im Transit, teilen für einen Moment diesen speziellen Ort, haben aber alle ein anderes, ein eigenes Ziel.  Weiterlesen…